Convoluted human evolution: How many proteins? (Introduction)

by David Turell @, Monday, July 25, 2016, 19:25 (666 days ago) @ David Turell

The proteins in a human have been annotated almost completely. Remember proteins are a complex set of molecules and humans have lots of them, and blind evolution found all of them to cooperate and make a human:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160725105235.htm

"The ability to reliably and reproducibly measure any protein of the human proteome in any tissue or cell-type is transformative for understanding systems-level properties as well as specific pathways in physiology and disease. In the lab of Professor Robert Moritz at ISB, a collaborative effort enabled the generation and verification of a compendium of highly specific targeted proteomic assays by the method called selected reaction monitoring, or SRM for short, now provides quantification of 99.7% of the 20,277 annotated human proteins by the widely accessible, sensitive and robust targeted mass spectrometric method selected reaction monitoring, SRM. This Human SRMAtlas provides definitive assay coordinates that conclusively identify the respective peptide in biological samples. (my bold)

"Although the accomplishment of the Human Genome Project in 2003 in creating an inventory of all human genes, the majority of protein research is still focused on the same relatively small subset of proteins that were explored before the human genome was mapped. To move beyond this stagnated proteogenomic research approach, the development of highly specific assays for essentially every human protein was needed. With a resource such as the Human SRMAtlas, the prospect of measuring any protein is now a reality. The Human SRMAtlas now provides verified MS assays based on SRM technology developed in a uniform and consistent process for essentially every protein of the human proteome. These assays can be rapidly deployed in systems biology and biomedical studies to identify and quantify any human protein with high sensitivity and high selectivity, and to navigate complete proteome maps to understand their biological functions."

Comment: Note the bold: over 20,277 different protein molecules make up a human. All by chance? Never.


Complete thread:

 RSS Feed of thread

powered by my little forum