Cambrian Explosion: full internal organs (Introduction)

by David Turell @, Friday, April 25, 2014, 16:51 (2164 days ago) @ David Turell

David: These animals appear from no precursors with full organ systems, gut, nervous, circulatory! An amazingly intact fossil:

http://phys.org/news/2014-04-ancient-shrimp-like-animals-modern-hearts.html

Further analysis shows that the ancient shrimp had a definitely more complex heart than the current shrimp. Can Darwinism accept that it starts complex and gets simpler?

http://www.biosciencetechnology.com/articles/2014/04/half-billion-year-old-heart-found-...

"520 million years ago, the first known animal heart was formed.

"It was the heart of an ancient shrimp, and quite a heart it was. For it, and its vascular system, have been found to be more complex than that of modern shrimp, researchers reported in a recent Nature Communications. Its cardiovascular system was apparently evolution's template for modern cardiovascular systems. Significant streamlining has occurred since"

Abstract of paper:

"The assumption that amongst internal organs of early arthropods only the digestive system withstands fossilization is challenged by the identification of brain and ganglia in early Cambrian fuxianhuiids and megacheirans from southwest China. Here we document in the 520-million-year-old Chengjiang arthropod Fuxianhuia protensa an exceptionally preserved bilaterally symmetrical organ system corresponding to the vascular system of extant arthropods. Preserved primarily as carbon, this system includes a broad dorsal vessel extending through the thorax to the brain where anastomosing branches overlap brain segments and supply the eyes and antennae. The dorsal vessel provides segmentally paired branches to lateral vessels, an arthropod ground pattern character, and extends into the anterior part of the abdomen. The addition of its vascular system to documented digestive and nervous systems resolves the internal organization of F. protensa as the most completely understood of any Cambrian arthropod, emphasizing complexity that had evolved by the early Cambrian."

http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2014/140407/ncomms4560/full/ncomms4560.html


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