King's English or not? (Introduction)

by David Turell @, Wednesday, March 30, 2022, 00:02 (60 days ago)

Our linguistic battle is because language is always changing through common usage:

https://transportist.org/2017/06/29/on-the-differences-between-autonomous-automated-sel...

"Today, most people use the terms Autonomous, Automated, Self-Driving, and Driverless as interchangeable. Even wikipedia does not differentiate. Yet some people in the field make a point of the differences (e.g. Alain Kornhauser). If I understand these differences correctly, a self-driving car is not as advanced as driverless, in that driverless doesn’t have the back-up of a person taking control, and self-driving might. Driverless taxis are not merely self-driving, they pick up passengers and may be personless. In SAE terms, driverless is Level 5, while self-driving is Level 4 or below.

"Generally, the difference between automatic (or automated) and autonomous is the degree of human intervention. An automated car does not have the level of intelligence or independence that an autonomous car has. So driverless and autonomous are nearer to synonyms, as are self-driving and automated. A truly autonomous car would decide on destination and route as well as control within the lanes. An automated car would follow orders about destination and route, and may only adopt some lane-keeping or car-following guidance.

"Nevertheless, I do not believe these differences can be preserved linguistically, even within the profession, the broad misuse and confusion will drown small differences of meaning."

Comment: Our real battle is about cells and how then work, as you note. My analogy fits my side. God programs cells fully: in the future we will certainly see delivery trucks fully programmed to take a box to a specific location all by itself following the program. It won't load itself or fuel itself like a living cell can. It will be fully autonomous with its programmed 'brain' thinking for it and making it react to any stimuli appropriately. My usage is a new commoner's usage, and the old strict definition alters to accommodate the unwashed madding crowd.


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